FAQs

FAQs

 

PrEP is for individuals who are HIV-negative. If you take PrEP daily, the medicine in your bloodstream can help block HIV from taking hold and spreading through your body. In other words, taking PrEP, a single pill taken once daily, is highly effective against HIV when taken every day.
PrEP stands for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis. Pre = before; exposure = coming into contact with HIV; prophylaxis = treatment to prevent an infection from happening. PrEP is an HIV-prevention strategy for HIV-negative people. By taking an anti-HIV medication, PrEP, before coming into contact with HIV, individuals can reduce their chances of becoming infected.
Currently, Truvada is the only U.S. FDA-approved drug for PrEP. It has been in use since 2012.
When taken correctly – consistently every day as prescribed – PrEP is more effective than condoms for the prevention of HIV. BUT, PrEP does not protect against other sexually transmitted infections or pregnancy. PrEP is most effective when taken every day and used together with safer sex practices such as the correct use of condoms.
PrEP is for anyone at risk of being infected with HIV through sex: men or transgender women who have sex with men and male-female sex partners.
PrEP is safe; but as with many drugs, some side effects like nausea, dizziness, fatigue, weight loss and other symptoms may occur. It is important to talk with your doctor about your health history and any concerns prior to taking Truvada, an FDA-approved drug for PrEP. Consult your doctor if you have a history of kidney or bone issues, or if you experience any discomfort.

PrEP stands for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis. PrEP is preventive and is taken before exposure to HIV. PEP stands for Post-Exposure Prophylaxis and is taken after you may have been exposed to HIV. PrEP is meant to be taken as a preventive method to HIV, while PEP is meant to be used only in emergency situations when you think you have been in contact with the HIV virus.

Unlike PrEP, PEP is not meant for people who might be exposed to HIV frequently. If you think you’re at ongoing risk for HIV, talk to your doctor about whether PrEP is right for you. If you think you’ve recently been exposed to HIV, talk to your health care provider or an emergency room doctor to see if PEP is the right choice.
Your health care provider should be able to provide you with PrEP, if they feel it is the right choice for you. If you encounter any issues with a health care provider when trying to learn more about PrEP or getting it prescribed, PrEP Navigators can assist you with finding another doctor or answering any questions you may have. You can find a Memphis Navigator near you on our resource map here.
According to the Centers for Disease Control, PrEP takes approximately seven days of daily use to reach the highest levels of protection from HIV for receptive anal sex and 20 days of daily use to reach maximum protection for all other activities. You must take PrEP daily for it to work.
If you plan to stop taking PrEP, talk to your doctor first to make sure it’s the right choice. You must take PrEP daily for it to work. But if you find you don’t need to worry about HIV prevention at a certain time, it is OK to start and stop PrEP. PrEP is a preventive step that may not be needed in every season of your life. Know that, if your circumstances change, you can restart PrEP; but it will take at least a week or longer of daily use to be effective again after any break in daily usage. Talk to your doctor to help you go through this process safely.
Prescribers are health care professionals who can prescribe the pill for PrEP. The only way to get PrEP is through a prescriber.

PrEP Navigators provide support to those hoping to learn more about PrEP and those who have made the decision to start PrEP. Navigators can help you find a PrEP prescriber and help with insurance and/or assistance programs to cover the costs of PrEP. Navigators follow up with patients for six months after starting PrEP, or longer if needed. They serve as a resource and guide. Navigators are qualified community health assisters and do not charge for their services.


PrEP is for individuals who are HIV-negative. If you take PrEP daily, the medicine in your bloodstream can help block HIV from taking hold and spreading through your body. In other words, taking PrEP, a single pill taken once daily, is highly effective against HIV when taken every day.
PrEP stands for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis. Pre = before; exposure = coming into contact with HIV; prophylaxis = treatment to prevent an infection from happening. PrEP is an HIV-prevention strategy for HIV-negative people. By taking an anti-HIV medication, PrEP, before coming into contact with HIV, individuals can reduce their chances of becoming infected.
Currently, Truvada is the only U.S. FDA-approved drug for PrEP. It has been in use since 2012.
When taken correctly – consistently every day as prescribed – PrEP is more effective than condoms for the prevention of HIV. BUT, PrEP does not protect against other sexually transmitted infections or pregnancy. PrEP is most effective when taken every day and used together with safer sex practices such as the correct use of condoms.
PrEP is for anyone at risk of being infected with HIV through sex: men or transgender women who have sex with men and male-female sex partners.
PrEP is safe; but as with many drugs, some side effects like nausea, dizziness, fatigue, weight loss and other symptoms may occur. It is important to talk with your doctor about your health history and any concerns prior to taking Truvada, an FDA-approved drug for PrEP. Consult your doctor if you have a history of kidney or bone issues, or if you experience any discomfort.

PrEP stands for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis. PrEP is preventive and is taken before exposure to HIV. PEP stands for Post-Exposure Prophylaxis and is taken after you may have been exposed to HIV. PrEP is meant to be taken as a preventive method to HIV, while PEP is meant to be used only in emergency situations when you think you have been in contact with the HIV virus.

Unlike PrEP, PEP is not meant for people who might be exposed to HIV frequently. If you think you’re at ongoing risk for HIV, talk to your doctor about whether PrEP is right for you. If you think you’ve recently been exposed to HIV, talk to your health care provider or an emergency room doctor to see if PEP is the right choice.
Your health care provider should be able to provide you with PrEP, if they feel it is the right choice for you. If you encounter any issues with a health care provider when trying to learn more about PrEP or getting it prescribed, PrEP Navigators can assist you with finding another doctor or answering any questions you may have. You can find a Memphis Navigator near you on our resource map here.
According to the Centers for Disease Control, PrEP takes approximately seven days of daily use to reach the highest levels of protection from HIV for receptive anal sex and 20 days of daily use to reach maximum protection for all other activities. You must take PrEP daily for it to work.
If you plan to stop taking PrEP, talk to your doctor first to make sure it’s the right choice. You must take PrEP daily for it to work. But if you find you don’t need to worry about HIV prevention at a certain time, it is OK to start and stop PrEP. PrEP is a preventive step that may not be needed in every season of your life. Know that, if your circumstances change, you can restart PrEP; but it will take at least a week or longer of daily use to be effective again after any break in daily usage. Talk to your doctor to help you go through this process safely.